Traditional English Puddings: hot, sticky & delicious

image2 - Copy (33)Is there anyone who doesn’t like a pudding? I’m talking about those sweet, hot, steaming desserts that are so comforting yet feel ever so slightly indulgent. Having spotted a gap in the market for high quality, handmade and quintessentially English puddings, after 18 months of research and recipe development Kate Lyons and her husband Max started their company “pudd’Eng” in 2016.

The current range consists of six puddings: marmalade; sticky toffee; syrup; chocolate & ale; treacle & walnut and spotted dick. Despite being a comparatively young business, the company has already won an award: the chocolate & ale pudding – made with Valrhona chocolate and ale from the Norfolk based Why Not Brewery – won the “Sweet Bakes” category in the 2016 Great British Food Awards. There are three sizes available: half-pint, pint and two pint and there are no artificial preservatives in the puddings.

The flavours are exceptionally good, for example, a hint of Earl Grey tea and lemon in the spotted dick; English whisky in the treacle and walnut pudding and a touch of ginger in the sticky toffee pudding which is topped with a velvety butterscotch sauce. When you’re ready to eat your chosen pudding, it can be steamed or if you really can’t wait, it can be popped in a microwave.

The pudd’Eng range is sold at selected retail outlets in Norfolk (and Suffolk) including: Walsingham Farm Shop, Back to the Garden in Letheringsett and City Farm Shop in Norwich. Kate will also be attending events such as The Royal Norfolk Show, The Aylsham Show and The North Norfolk Food Festival. However, if you live further afield the puddings are now available by mail order via the website and there are plans to develop partnerships with retailers in other parts of the UK. If you want to stock up, the puddings can be frozen and eaten at a later date – if you can wait that long!

www.puddeng.com

Twitter: @eatpuddeng

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/eatpuddeng

 

 

 

 

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The Foraging Fox Beetroot Ketchup – A Review

As I’ve recently lost a lot of weight and have adopted a much healthier way of eating, I started to reminisce about what I ate as a child. I am of an age where I can remember when “Findus Crispy Pancakes” were the latest in convenience food, not to mention Vesta Chow Mein, fish fingers and Fray Bentos pies that came in a tin!

I do recall that the one constant thing in my 1970s diet was tomato ketchup. I had it with everything and my mother reminds me (too often!) that I once embarrassed her in a restaurant when I was about 8 or 9 years old by asking the waiter for some. But then, was that so bad when you consider that my parents were probably drinking a bottle of “Blue Nun” at the time?

Anyway, since those stodgy days of my youth my tastes – thank goodness – have changed for the better. When you’re on a diet, you have to do away with rich, creamy or buttery sauces so instead I like to use a variety of condiments and sauces to accompany meals but they mustn’t be too boring and they have to taste exceptional. These days, I find that tomato ketchup can taste a little sickly and over sweet, even the ones that have a reduced sugar content. It was therefore rather timely that the producers of “The Foraging Fox” range of beetroot ketchups asked me to try their brand and write a review.

As a company, “The Foraging Fox” was launched at the Speciality and Fine Foods Fair in 2014 and the range currently consists of three flavours of beetroot ketchup: Original; Hot and Smoked. On the bottles, it confidently states, “good with everything” and so I was keen to put that claim to the test.

Before I try anything, I like to check the ingredients as I’ve become more conscious of too much sugar or salt in food products. Reassuringly, all three beetroot ketchups are 100% natural and there are no artificial colours, sweeteners or flavourings. The ketchups are sweetened with apple juice and the gloriously vibrant pinky purple colour comes, of course, from the beetroot itself.

I kicked off with the “original” beetroot ketchup so I knew what I was dealing with. I tasted it on a teaspoon first so I could really get a feel for the texture and taste. I was expecting the ketchup to be quite grainy, as beetroot has such an earthy flavour but in fact it was pretty smooth and flowed well out of the bottle. (I didn’t have to whack it on the base to get any out!)

I put a large dollop of the “Original” beetroot ketchup in a ramekin to accompany my light lunch of cheese on toast. These days I eat reduced fat cheese which can sometimes be a little bland but the ketchup gave it a real boot up the backside. My taste buds joyously welcomed a flavoursome combination of beetroot and apple plus a subtle hint of acidity from the red grape vinegar. The ketchup is not excessively sweet and paired well with the salty tang of the cheddar. You don’t see many people of my age dipping toasted cheese fingers in a little pot of bright pink sauce but I highly recommend it.

Next I tried the “hot” beetroot ketchup. This combines chilli-infused beetroot with horseradish and my initial teaspoon taster was a little deceptive. At first I thought there was a little hint of horseradish, not too peppery, and so I put some on my plate when we had steak for dinner. Well, after a couple of mouthfuls, I could definitely feel some heat and the horseradish flavour became more pronounced. However, it wasn’t too strong and really complemented the steak.

I find horseradish sauce on its own can be rather overpowering although I love the flavour so the “hot” beetroot ketchup is an excellent choice if you can’t take too much heat in your horseradish! My husband has Polish heritage and he has a “thing” about beetroot – he absolutely loves it. He’s not usually a sauce man (ooh Matron!) but he tried this and gave it a two thumbs up verdict.

Finally, I opened the “smoked” beetroot ketchup. Back in the day when my deprived taste buds existed largely on the wrong sort of food, I never thought I’d like smoked sauces. The idea seemed odd to me – why would you want to add a smokey taste to something that was perfectly good already? But….. once I’d discovered smoked paprika I was hooked and it seemed like a perfectly reasonable thing to do after all.

In my opinion, the “smoked” beetroot ketchup has the balance of flavours spot on. It’s a subtle taste due to the beetroot being smoked rather than a liquid smoke being added to the product. This smoked beetroot ketchup would go well with barbecued food in the summer but as I was testing this on a dull day in March, I made chicken and vegetable skewers and stuck them under my grill. I thought I’d be a bit creative and as well as some ketchup in a little ramekin, I also made a dip by adding some of the ketchup to some Greek yoghurt and mixing it together with a sprinkle of dill. Oh yum! This was really delicious and again received my husband’s approval

I’d highly recommend all three of the beetroot ketchups made by “The Foraging Fox”. They go well with a variety of foods e.g. meat, cheese, eggs, vegetables and can be used with other ingredients to make dips and dressings. I have to say, I do like a food product that can be used in different ways – you feel you’re getting more bang for your buck!

All of the beetroot ketchups are gluten free and suitable for vegans and vegetarians (they have been approved by the Vegetarian Society).

Here are the nutritional panels so you can see that there are no nastiest in these ketchup:

 

 

 

Finally, I always like to highlight how any foodie products I review can be incorporated into the Slimming World eating plan, so here are the amounts of – reassuringly low – Syns in each flavour:

Original            – 1 level tablespoon                 1 Syn

Smoked           – 1 level tablespoon                 1 Syn

Hot                  – 1 level tablespoon                 ½ Syn

 

For more information or to order on line, go to www.foragingfox.com

Twitter: @theforagingfox

 

Disclaimer: the above represents my honest opinion of the beetroot ketchups made by “The Foraging Fox”, who kindly sent me samples to try. From time to time I am sent products to review and the fact they are free does not influence my reviews in any way. My reviews are always fair, unbiased and genuine and I have not been paid to write them.

 

Oodles of Healthy Noodles

One of the great things about writing a food blog is having the opportunity to review new products, kitchen equipment or food. I was recently asked to try “Mr Lee’s Noodles” which are marketed as “Gourmet Oriental Noodles in a Cup”. They are gluten-free, and contain freeze-dried ingredients which retain flavours better once reconstituted  – as opposed to dehydrated – with “absolutely no nasties”. And there’s more – they’re low in salt, low in sugar, low in saturated fats and low in calories. All well and good but would they also be low in taste?

I was keen to put them to the test as I’m always on the lookout for healthy options for food on the go but first I thought I’d better see what the competition was like so I trotted along to the supermarket to see what I could find. It seemed that a popular and not too expensive variety was “Pot Noodle” and there are apparently at least a dozen different flavours to choose from. I selected the Chicken & Mushroom – here it is:

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And here’s the nutritional information on the back of the pot:

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It’s disappointing for someone who’s trying to eat more healthily to see palm fat and monosodium glutamate in a list of ingredients and what exactly do things like potassium carbonate and disodium inosinate add to these noodles? If I don’t know what it is, I’m certainly not going to eat it.

So onto the noodles provided by the team at Mr Lee’s.

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I spent a week trying out the six available flavours (noodles almost every day!) and you can see below what I thought of them. It’s worth bearing in mind that I’ve never tasted any other brand of instant cup noodle (I only photographed the chicken and mushroom Pot Noodle – it then went back on the supermarket shelf because the ingredients really put me off) so I couldn’t do a direct taste comparison with other noodles on the market. I took photos of the nutritional information panels of each Mr Lee’s flavour and there are indeed no “nasties” such as monosodium glutamate or palm fat. I’ve also calculated – for any Slimming World members who may be reading this review – the amount of Syns per pot and Mr Lee’s Noodles are reassuringly low Syn.

As I’m a bit of a chilli wimp, I thought I’d start with a flavour that was classed as ‘mild’ ( one chilli rating) – Hong Kong Street Beef. Mr Lee’s consist of rice noodles which I find are a lighter option than wheat noodles.

Here’s the nutritional panel:

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Here’s what they looked like when I’d made them up:

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You can see the decent sized pieces of beef (which actually tasted of beef and not some indeterminate meaty substance) , broccoli and red pepper and the noodles softened very well but weren’t soggy. There was more than a subtle hint of chilli – I’d say 5/10 in the heat stakes – and the flavours of ginger and five spice were evident in the light, savoury sauce. The sauce had a clean, fresh taste and wasn’t over salty. Slimming World Syn value – 2 Syns per pot

Next I tried the Shaolin Monk Vegetable noodles.

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This flavour is suitable for vegetarians but not vegans as it contains honey. This flavour has no chilli rating. It had a good selection of vegetable pieces with cauliflower, green beans, red pepper and sweetcorn being particularly evident.

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Although five spice, garlic granules and yeast extract were listed as ingredients, they didn’t come through that well. Overall, this pot was quite bland and while not unpleasant, it was a little disappointing as I thought the variety of vegetables – including usually more robust porcini mushrooms – would add more flavour. Perhaps a little chilli would have livened it up. Slimming World Syn value – 1 ½ per pot

Next came the Warrior Fighting Shrimp flavour.

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Now this flavour was rated “3 chillis” so I was prepared for quite a whack of heat.

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What came through very strongly at first was the five spice and the fish sauce and the hit from the chilli came soon after and numbed my taste buds somewhat – so much so that I couldn’t really distinguish any other flavours. The prawns were quite plump and you could see spring onion and seaweed flakes but for me, the chilli overwhelmed them. I think a “medium / two chilli rating” would have allowed the other elements to shine a little more. I found the chilli levels in this pot a little too challenging – perhaps a 9/10 heat factor – and would recommend having a large glass of water nearby. Due to the amount of chilli in this and the very fishy taste (as opposed to a more delicate seafood flavour), this was my least favourite of the noodles I tried and I didn’t finish the pot. Slimming World Syn value – 1 ½ per pot

The first of two chicken varieties I tried was the Tail Chi Chicken.

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Once made up, this pot had quite a strong smell of chicken (not artificial) and the pieces of meat were clearly visible along with sweetcorn and green beans.

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There was a noticeable hint of ginger which balanced the overall flavour and it reminded me – in a good way – of chicken and sweetcorn soup that I used to eat in Chinese restaurants, back in the day. This had no chilli in it but there was a gentle warmth from the ginger and plenty of flavour without it. Slimming World Syn value – 2 per pot

Next I chose the Dragon Fire Mushroom pot.

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This had a rating of three chillis like the Warrior Fighting Shrimps and so I prepared myself with a glass of water and an electric fan – just in case. (Actually, I’m joking about the fan!) Reassuringly there were a lot of mushrooms in this pot along with red pepper pieces.

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When made up, the vegetables looked very substantial and the mushrooms weren’t slimy once reconstituted. The liquid was very well absorbed so it was less “soupy” than the other varieties I tried. This pot had a mild savoury taste with a hint of wild garlic and surprisingly, given the three chilli rating, wasn’t as hot as I’d anticipated. I’d say it had an 8/10 chilli factor and as a result I managed to finish all of it. Slimming World Syn value – 1 ½ per pot.

The final pot of Mr Lee’s Noodles was Penang Chicken Curry Laksa which had a two chilli rating so I expected a manageable medium heat.

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When prepared, this pot had a good mix of chicken pieces, cauliflower and red pepper.

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The ingredients included coconut cream but I couldn’t really taste is as the predominant flavour was curry powder – which was fine but I’d hoped the coconut would have had more of a presence. I’d give the heat from the chilli a 6/10 rating. I felt this pot had a good ‘clean’ flavour and the curry taste didn’t linger on my tongue afterwards. Slimming World Syn value – 2 per pot

 

Having sampled all six varieties of Mr Lee’s Noodles, I would recommend them for occasions when you have to grab lunch on the go. Of course, I’ve given my honest opinion on each of the flavours based on what I like and the fact that I can’t eat food with too much chilli.

Mr Lee’s Noodles would be a good cupboard standby for times when you can’t always cook from scratch e.g. when you’re at work as all you need is a kettle. All varieties are gluten-free and some flavours are suitable for vegetarians.

Slimming World members – Mr Lee’s Noodles are only 1 ½ or 2 Syns per pot whereas standard pot noodles (any brand) are at least 5 Syns – and may contain several unhealthy ingredients and fillers too. As far as ‘fast food’ goes, Mr Lee’s Noodles are a healthy option that you can easily incorporate into the food optimising lifestyle.

 

Mr Lee’s Noodles (and there is a real Mr Lee behind them) are not currently available in supermarkets but you can buy them online at: www.mrleesnoodles.com.

 

 

Disclaimer: I was sent a box of Mr Lee’s Noodles in return for an honest review. The above reflects my genuine opinion of the product.

 

JosephJoseph Spiro Spiraliser – Product Review

People who follow ‘The Little Pink Kitchen’ on social media are aware that in the last year I’ve lost a lot of weight at Slimming World – over 5 stone. As a result, I’ve recently changed the focus of my blog from baking (which I love but it isn’t good for my waistline) to healthy eating – although this doesn’t mean that I’ll never eat cake again!

When I say ‘healthy eating’, I don’t mean anything faddy just fresh food that is prepared from scratch in a healthy way (low fat / low sugar etc) but without compromising on flavour.

It was therefore very timely that I was contacted by JosephJoseph who asked if I’d like to try their new 3 in 1 hand-held spiraliser – called Spiro – and write a review. As I’m already a fan of the brand, I had no hesitation in saying yes and yesterday I spent some time playing around with the spiraliser and a selection of vegetables. Oh, and some cheese was involved too.

When you purchase the spiraliser, it looks like this:

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Out of the packaging, there are 5 components which include 3 different blades: a coarse and a fine spiralising blade and a grating blade. The soft grip lid is easy to turn and it has 2 guide arms that keep the food straight when you twist it.

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The spiralised or grated food is then collected in the clear container which means you don’t get bits of vegetables over the worktop. What’s really handy is how compact the gadget is: when not in use the three blades stack on top of each other and the whole thing takes up hardly any space in a cupboard or a drawer.

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I selected vegetables with different textures (courgette, peeled carrot and peeled butternut squash), washed them and trimmed them into straight pieces. JosephJoseph recommends that for the best results, the vegetables should measure roughly 3 inches x 1 ½ inches (8 x 4 cms).

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JosephJoseph provides clear instructions on how to use the spiraliser:

  1. Cut food into straight pieces with flat ends
  2. Select blade type – take care as they are sharp!
  3. Place food in the centre of the blade disc and push down onto the spindle in the centre
  4. Place the lid on top and insert the guide arms into the slots
  5. Twist the lid clockwise and push downwards to spiralise. (Try and keep a constant pressure as you twist.)

I started with the courgette and used the fine spiralising blade. While the courgette went through easily enough, the resulting spirals were very small and quite watery so I changed to the coarser blade and this gave thicker and very long courgette spirals. You can see the difference in the photograph below. I patted the spirals dry with kitchen towel afterwards as they have a high water content and I didn’t want them to go soggy.

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Next, I tried carrot on the fine blade and again, it worked well although I didn’t get very long spirals. On reflection, this was due to the fact that my carrot was a bit too skinny and once on the spindle, didn’t reach all of the blade. Note to self: next time buy fatter carrots! You can see the result of using a carrot that was too thin in the photograph below although of course it’s still edible.

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After this, I used the butternut squash with the coarse blade and given that my pieces were not round, the resulting spirals were good. There were one or two shorter ones but on the whole, the butternut squash ‘spaghetti’ came out very well as you can see in then photograph.

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I had intended to try beetroot as well but I couldn’t find any in the supermarket but as in its raw state it is quite hard, I’m sure it would have spiralised well. I’m not sure if it would stain the gadget though so that’s something to be mindful about. Sweet potatoes would also be a suitable vegetable to spiralise.

I’ve eaten a lot of vegetables during my weight loss journey with Slimming World and it’s always good to find new ways to serve them. I really like raw veggies in salads and when they’re spiralised they look so pretty and are easier to eat and digest. Here’s a photograph of my beautiful spiralised vegetables just before I put them in the fridge.fullsizerender-19-copy

We had spiralised raw vegetable salad with our dinner last night with a little lemon juice and a sprinkle of herbs and red jalapeno flakes. My husband added some olive oil to his portion and I have to say, the glistening veggies looked extremely appetising. They would have been equally as good lightly stir-fried with some garlic and perhaps a dash of soy and / or sweet chilli sauce.

One of the latest food trends is to have spiralised vegetables instead of traditional pasta (giving a low carbohydrate option) and in this case, they just need a quick steam for about a minute. Any longer and they will turn to mush so don’t overcook them.

Finally, I tried the grating blade with a chunk of hard cheddar. The cheese went through the grater like butter – very smoothly indeed. You really don’t have to apply a lot of pressure at all on the lid to get good results which makes it ideal for people who don’t have a lot of strength in their wrists or hands.

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Overall, I was impressed with the JosephJoseph Spiro spiraliser and I’d rate it as follows:

 

Ease of use:                5/5

Easy to clean:              5/5

Easy to assemble:       5/5

Easy to store:              5/5

 

I have previously used another brand’s hand-held spiraliser – one that is described as being operated with a ‘pencil-sharpening’ motion. That one didn’t have its own container and I actually found it quite hard work turning it so it’s currently languishing in the back of a drawer.

I’ve also seen the somewhat clunky spiralisers that you have to assemble that then sit on a worktop, taking up a lot of space. While these might be quite useful for large households, they aren’t particularly attractive and they are quite cumbersome especially as you have to crank a handle to work them. These tend to be recommended by some of the high profile but not always nutritionally qualified ‘clean-eating’ brigade and are quite expensive compared to the Spiro.

In my opinion, the Spiro would be an ideal addition to your kitchen if you have young children as it would certainly encourage them to eat more vegetables. For a two person household like mine, I found it quick and easy to spiralise a few vegetables for us and the clean-up was also fast. The Spiro can be put in a dishwasher although it’s easy to wash it in the sink. I love the fact that all the parts stack up together into a compact little unit which can be easily stored. The Spiro will not be languishing in the back of my cupboards, that’s for sure.

 

You can find the Spiro spiraliser in good cook shops and online at: www.josephjoseph.com. The retail price is £16.

 

A note for Slimming World members (like me) – the Spiro will really encourage you to eat more speed vegetables so do think about buying one.

 

Disclaimer: JosephJoseph sent me a Spiro Spiraliser in return for an honest review. After thoroughly testing it, I was genuinely impressed with it and I will continue to use it. If you’re thinking of purchasing one, I’m happy to discuss my review in more detail with you via email: littlepinkkitchen@hotmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review: Purition Wholefood Shakes

I’m definitely not a ‘gym bunny’ and exercise – apart from occasional bracing walks with the dog – has never played a major part in my life despite having a husband and son who rave about the joys of keeping fit. You may therefore be surprised to hear that I was recently sent some samples of ‘wholefood protein shakes’ to try by the people behind the “Purition” brand.

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Purition claims three uses for its wholefood shakes: 1) for gym, cardio & training support; 2) for healthy eating purposes and 3) for diet & fat loss. Well, that last category is what interested me as when I reflect on my past, I seem to have been one of life’s permanent dieters. And yes, I’m aware that being on a ‘permanent’ diet means that whatever I’ve been doing for the last few years hasn’t been working. I’ve tried a lot of ‘weight reduction’ programmes in my time including WeightWatchers (all those points to calculate and I was still hungry), Atkins (who wouldn’t love a diet where you could eat bacon every day?) and LighterLife (I lost almost 7 stone in 6 months but then went back to my poor eating habits and piled it back on within 2 years).

I’m currently attending a well-known diet club and I’m doing well on it (almost 4 stone gone since January) but I’m finding that sometimes my meal planning goes a bit haywire or I have to dash off to a job interview and don’t have time for breakfast or lunch. Now when you are easily tempted by food that tastes nice (usually involving fat, carbs and lots of sugar) but has absolutely no nutritional value, missing a meal is not the way to go. So what to do?

That’s where I’ve found Purition shakes invaluable. Unlike some brands that contain fillers and things with unpronounceable names (acetylated oxidised starch anyone?), Purition contains ‘real’ ingredients such as nuts, seeds, nutritional yeast and vanilla. Because the shakes contain fibre, you stay full for at least 4 hours which meant that once I’d had a shake for breakfast, I didn’t experience any  “mid-morning munchie moments”. This is a very significant thing for someone like me as feeling hungry when on a diet is usually what derails me.

Here are the ingredients found in Purition shakes:

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And here are the ingredients found in one range of ‘diet’ shakes (where you have 3 shakes a day, tons of water and no other food at all):

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I think you’ll agree there’s quite a difference in the respective contents and from a nutritional point of view, Purition definitely has the edge!  (Apologies for the poor photographs.)

I liked all the Purition varieties I tried especially the macadamia and vanilla. The flavours are subtle and the shakes are made from genuine ingredients and don’t contain cheap fillers and artificial flavourings. The texture is somewhat coarser than a basic protein powder and for some people this may take a little getting used to but it’s good because once you’ve blended it – I used my Nutribullet – with the milk of your choice (cow / soya /almond etc), it thickens up due to the fibre content so each shake is really substantial. If you leave the shake for a while, you may need to eat it with a spoon as it will continue to thicken but that’s not a bad thing.

For anyone wanting to try out Purition for weight loss, on the website there is a 7 day meal plan whereby you’d have two shakes a day plus a snack as well as an evening meal. Information about the shakes for people who exercise is also on the website, of course.

For more information and how to acquire a sample pack of the protein shakes, have a look at the website: www.purition.co.uk

 

 

Disclaimer: I received some free samples of Purition shakes in return for an honest review. This post reflects my genuine opinion of the Purition products and I would definitely recommend them to anyone who, like me, has struggled with their weight. Purition offers a healthy and convenient meal replacement option and a website that gives lots of advice and support.

 

 

 

 

 

A review of Creake Abbey Farmers’ Market, Norfolk

We’ve recently moved to North Norfolk from south London where every month in our small town a ‘Farmers’ Market’ took place, or rather, what a non-country town would class as one anyway. There were usually about 15 stalls and while you could buy cheese, some meat and fish, vegetables and cakes, most of the stallholders were not local and the goods weren’t particularly exciting. The Council wouldn’t allow two stalls to sell similar wares so you didn’t have the option of trying a variety of foodie things from different suppliers which I found a little disappointing.

So when I saw that Creake Abbey in North Creake, Norfolk, holds a monthly Farmers’ Market with over 50 – yes, fifty – food producers in attendance, I simply had to go and have a look. From where I live, this meant a 70 mile round trip but for a morning out where I could indulge my curiosity for all things food-related, it would be worth it. As luck would have it, it was a fine day and the drive there was easy. The traffic in Norfolk is nothing like it was near Croydon!

When I arrived at Creake Abbey on Saturday 7th May, I really didn’t know where to begin browsing as there are some permanent shops on the site, a café, a food hall as well as the various stalls run by the local producers. I felt like a kid in a sweet shop – slightly overwhelmed by the scale of it all but desperate to see as much as I could.

To sum it up and as detailed on the flyers for the market, you could buy: the finest meat and vegetables, pies, pastries, puddings and tartes, fresh juices, cordials, breads and ‘morning goods’, dairy produce, cheese, plants, herbs, beer, chocolate, fudge and more. Many of the stallholders provided tasting samples which is a great idea although my Slimming World leader may have been slightly aghast at the amount of things I had to try!

I can’t list here all the wonderful produce I saw although I’ll give a shout out to the companies whose goods I purchased on the day.

Here is the lovely Candi from “Candi’s Chutney”.

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I love a good chutney or pickle and Candi has come up with some sublime flavours. I had to sample several (ahem) but went away clutching jars of Parsnip & Chilli, Norfolk Nobbly (yes, really!) and a seasonal asparagus chutney. For me, a plus point is that Candi doesn’t fill most of her chutneys with lots of dried fruit as I really don’t like sultanas and raisins. Apparently a new flavour is under development and I’ve been told gin will be involved. Now that is one to watch out for! Candi’s website is: www.candischutney.vpweb.co.uk

I was delighted to find that the Fruit Pig Company sold their own version of an elusive sausage that I’d been hankering after for a while and so I nabbed one of the last packs of ‘merguez’. This is traditionally a red spicy mutton or beef based fresh sausage flavoured with cumin, chilli pepper and other spices and originated from Arab / North African cuisine. I first tasted it when I lived in Paris years ago but sadly you don’t see it much in the UK although you can find it at specialist or ethnic butchers. You can order your porky goodies online including some posh black pudding: www.fruitpigcompany.com

Here is the very friendly, smiley chap I bought the merguez from:

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I met Sarah who produces the most divine “Bray’s Cottage Pork Pies” and I simply had to buy a seasonal special which was pork and wild garlic. I took this home and shared it with my husband – he was a happy man! Both he and I recall the awful mass produced pork pies we used to be given in packed lunches when we went on school trips in the 1970s. Thank goodness there are people like Sarah who have elevated the humble pork pie to superstar status. The ingredients are simple but high quality: North Norfolk outdoor reared pork, a secret blend of herbs and spices and a hot water crust pastry plus other ingredients depending on the season. There is no jelly in the pies so what you taste is pure porky, herby goodness. The website is: http://www.perfectpie.co.uk

I know from personal experience that you can buy Bray’s Cottage pies in places like ‘Back to the Garden’ in Letheringsett, ‘Bakers and Larners’ in Holt and ‘Picnic Fayre’ in Cley but of course the pies are to be found elsewhere too. Here’s Sarah on the stall, which I have to say was looking extremely ‘sold out’ by the time I got there.

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Finally, I didn’t just buy things I could eat – I also found a lovely tea supplier called “Nelson & Norfolk Tea Co” run by Mark Richmond who is based in North Walsham. I purchased a couple of his fruity, caffeine free blends which smelled absolutely wonderful. Mark has over 20 years’ experience in the tea business and his range includes the very popular ‘Norfolk Tea’ (an all-day blend of black teas), ‘Norfolk Earl Grey’, chocolate tea, fruity teas and green teas.

Mark’s website is: www.nelsonandnorfolktea.co.uk

This was the tea stall on the day I visited:

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I chatted with lots of other producers – including ‘Ollands Farm Foods’, ‘Chilli Fundamentals’ and ‘Hands On Preserves’ – but sadly my spending money on the day was limited otherwise I would have bought more goodies. There’s always next time though as the Farmers’ Market is held on the first Saturday of every month (except January). If you are free on Saturday 4th June 2016, I recommend you go along as Creake Abbey definitely holds one of the best Farmers’ Markets that I’ve seen.

The website with all the details is: www.creakeabbey.co.uk

 

 

Disclaimer: I was not asked to write about Creake Abbey Farmers’ Market and the above article represents my impressions on the day. I was not given any freebies or incentivised in any other way in return for a favourable review.

 

 

Scarlett & Mustard product reviews with recipes

I was asked by ‘My Foodie Heaven’ to try out and review some products made by Scarlett & Mustard. I’d already heard of the company and had seen some of their products with their quirky labelling in the shops so I was keen to see what they were like.

I received a parcel containing the delightfully named ‘Rudolph’s Left Overs Curry Sauce’, an English rapeseed oil flavoured with truffle (oil, not chocolates!) and a blackcurrant and star anise curd.

When I’m asked to review any food product, rather than just sticking my finger in the jar, tasting it and rating it out of ten, where possible I try to create a recipe that will really bring out the flavour. At the moment, we’re in the middle of moving from Surrey to Norfolk and so it’s slightly chaotic in our house . However, we still need to eat but as my kitchen facilities are now rather basic, any food I prepare has to be quick and easy.

With that in mind, I came up with two recipes using the Left Overs Curry Sauce and the truffle rapeseed oil and decided to test the blackcurrant and star anise curd out as part of a traditional afternoon tea.

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‘Rudolph’s Left Overs Curry Sauce’ is an oil free dressing full of fruity, tangy flavours and it will, quite simply, transform your left overs from one meal into a tasty dish for another. You don’t have to limit yourself to using it for left overs though: I used it to make a light ‘coronation’ style sauce to have with chicken which was delicious. By mixing Greek yoghurt with Rudolph’s in a 2:1 ratio, I had a simple sauce which was far superior to the heavy ‘coronation chicken’ dish I recall from the 1970s (which was basically curry powder mixed with mayonnaise). What I liked about Rudolph’s is that you could actually taste the fruit in it (mango chutney, apricots and sultanas) and the heat from the ginger and curry powder was subtle.

Coronation chicken S and M

 

Scarlett & Mustard also recommend Rudolph’s with roasts (including your Christmas bird if you plan to have one), on rice and peas, on potatoes and even on salads. What you do with it is only limited by your imagination. I’m sorry the photo of my chicken dish isn’t brilliant – my ‘staging’ props for my photos have been packed away but you get the idea.

 

For the English truffle rapeseed oil, I thought a potato recipe would be in order as it would be blending two wonderfully earthy flavours together. Readers of this blog will be aware from previous posts that I love the versatility of the humble spud and for this recipe I turned once again to Maris Pipers but you could use any floury potato for this dish.

 

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Truffled Crushed Potatoes

Ingredients – for 2 servings

300g Maris Piper potatoes

150mls semi skimmed milk (or use soya milk for vegan option)

I twig of fresh rosemary

1 tbsp Scarlett & Mustard English Rapeseed Truffle Oil

3 tbsp single cream (or use vegan cream)

 

Method

  1. Cut the potatoes into chunks and put in a large saucepan with the milk and add a little water to cover. Season with a little salt if required. Once boiling, allow to simmer for 15 – 20 minutes until tender. Add the rosemary twig about 5 minutes before the end so it infuses the cooking liquid.
  2. Drain the potatoes leaving a little of the cooking liquid but throw away the rosemary.
  3. Using a potato masher, gently crush the potatoes to break them up. You aren’t looking for mashed potatoes so go carefully!
  4. Add the truffle oil and the cream to the potatoes and turn them gently to coat.
  5. Tip the potatoes into an ovenproof dish and place under a hot grill for a few minutes to brown the top.
  6. If you’ve made the potatoes to eat later, you can reheat them in the oven for 15 – 20 minutes at 180 C / 200 C fan or gas mark 6 until the top goes golden.
  7. Eat and enjoy.

I’m afraid there isn’t a photo of this dish as it was demolished as soon as it came out of the oven!

 

Finally, for the blackcurrant and star anise curd, I used it to fill Viennese whirls and I also sampled it on a scone with butter. I was apprehensive about how the star anise would affect the flavour of the blackcurrant but I have to say that it’s an inspired combination. The blackcurrant is not over-sweet or sugary and the star anise gives it a real warmth without overshadowing the fruity flavour.

 

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I used my friend Kevin’s recipe for the Viennese whirls – you can find it on his blog www.thecraftylarder.co.uk – and dipped them in white chocolate and sprinkles. Bit of a girly moment!

 

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I can confirm that based on my tasting of the products I was sent, Scarlett & Mustard are purveyors of excellent foodie items and I recommend you look out for them in your local shops. They’d make ideal Christmas presents and would look particularly stylish in an elegant hamper.

 

All Scarlett & Mustard products can be found on their website: www.scarlettandmustard.co.uk

 

 

Disclaimer: I was sent a package of Scarlett & Mustard goods to review and I was not paid. My review reflects my honest opinion of the items I was given.

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