Wagamama Norwich – A Review

Wagamama first opened its doors in Bloomsbury, London, in 1992 and in the 25 years since then has grown into a chain of over 120 restaurants in the UK with more than 20 overseas.

Wagamama in Norwich has recently undergone a “shiny new” refurbishment and I was lucky enough to be invited along last week with other food bloggers and writers for the official re-opening. I was accompanied by my friend Cathy – an avid foodie like me – and between us we tasted (and tested) a variety of dishes. We met one of Wagamama’s top executive chefs who talked about Wagamama’s food and history. I was particularly interested to see the new vegan menu which offers some delicious meat and dairy free dishes.

Before the refurbishment, the restaurant had a slightly clinical feel: bright white walls, a lime green feature wall and plenty of stainless steel. The new décor is a complete contrast: while there is still a white and green theme (but no lime!), it’s been softened by the addition of exposed brickwork on pillars, wood panelling and a marble bar counter. Copper coloured pendant light fittings cast a warm glow throughout the restaurant and the large wall mirrors – with a hint of copper on the glass add a sense of space. The bench seating has remained and adds a sociable feel to the dining experience. In my opinion, the new colour scheme and feature lighting are very stylish and make the Wagamama experience more relaxing and intimate.

The waiting staff whetted our appetites with a selection of side dishes, which were placed in the centre of the long table so that we could all dig in. The pork ribs in a Korean barbecue sauce were very popular as was the chilli squid.

We tried two prawn sides: ebi katsu (crispy fried prawns in panko breadcrumbs served with a spicy chilli and garlic sauce) and lollipop prawn kushiyaki (prawn skewers marinated in lemongrass, lime and chilli). For me, the star of the side dishes was beef tataki: lightly seared marinated steak, thinly sliced and served chilled, dressed with citrus ponzu and Japanese mayonnaise.

We chose our own main dishes and each of us ordered something different. I chose the chicken and prawn pad thai (rice noodles in an amai sauce with egg, beansprouts, leeks, chilli and red onion, garnished with fried shallots, peanuts, mint, coriander and fresh lime) while Cathy plumped for the chilli ramen with chicken (a spicy chicken broth topped with red and spring onions, beansprouts, chilli, coriander and fresh lime). I noticed that there was an awful lot of red chilli in Cathy’s bowl but she coped with it admirably!

Someone else on our table had selected the Wagamama ramen which was a substantial bowl of food containing chicken, seasoned pork, prawns and mussels in a rich chicken broth with dashi and miso. Another diner had the steak bulgogi which consisted of marinated sirloin steak and miso-fried aubergine served on soba noodles, dressed in a sesame and bulgogi sauce and finished with spring onions, kimchee and half a tea-stained egg.

The portions of food were very generous and well presented. The chefs had clearly taken time to ensure that the dishes had visual appeal as well as great flavour.

Some desserts then miraculously appeared on our table including a white chocolate and ginger cheesecake that was drizzled with a chilli toffee and ginger sauce, yuzu and lemon tart and a wonderfully moreish cake comprising layers of chocolate sponge, dark chocolate parfait and hazelnut cream with a sleek chocolate mirror glaze. By this time I think we were all quite full but for the purposes of research we valiantly clutched our forks and sampled each of the puds. Well, it would have been rude not to!

I should mention at this point that we could have chosen dishes from the vegetarian and vegan menu. Meat-free at Wagamama doesn’t mean taste-free: side dishes included bang bang cauliflower; mixed aubergine and panko aubergine hirata steamed bun and yasai gyoza with a dipping sauce. For lovers of katsu curry, the vegetarian version consisted of sweet potato, aubergine and butternut squash coated in crispy panko breadcrumbs, covered in an aromatic curry sauce and served with white rice and a side salad. Vegan main courses included yasai pad thai, kare burosu ramen and yasai samla curry. The vegan dessert options were limited to two different flavoured fruit sorbets but I would hope that the Wagamama chefs will soon add more puds to the menu.

The drinks selection was varied with a choice of teas, coffee, wines (bottles or by the glass), beer, soft drinks and fresh juices – there was definitely something available to suit everyone.

I left Wagamama in Norwich feeling pleasantly full and I will return as soon as I can to try some other things on the menu. It will take several visits to try everything but I don’t think that’ll be an onerous task! The waiting staff were courteous and attentive and we appreciated the Executive Chef taking time to talk to us about the food, the flavours and the Wagamama ethos.

 

 

I was invited to Wagamama for a complementary meal in order to review the restaurant following its recent refurbishment. The above reflects my honest opinion of my November 2017 visit. The photographs of the food items are taken from Wagamama’s website.

 

 

Advertisements

Norfolk’s “Liquid Gold” – A Review Of Crush Foods’ Rapeseed Oil

Continuing my series of articles on independent Norfolk food producers, I headed for a pot of liquid gold that’s found in a quiet corner of North Norfolk.

As a keen cook I was delighted to find a culinary oil that offers a healthier option than many on the market as well as a range of innovative associated products, look no further than North Norfolk based Crush Foods.

Operating since 2010, the company uses only Norfolk grown oil seed rape in its products as it firmly believes in the importance of supporting local growers. Crush Foods’ rapeseed oil is unrefined due to being cold-pressed mechanically on-site. It’s then triple-filtered which makes it extra light and a crystal clear golden yellow colour. All Crush products are produced in Salle, Norfolk by a small, dedicated team of people who ensure that high standards are always met. Rapeseed oil contains half the saturated fat of extra virgin olive oil and is high in Omegas 3, 6 and 9 which are essential for healthy bones and joints, brain function, heart health and balanced cholesterol.

As well as the original cold-pressed rapeseed oil, Crush now offers a range of infused oils including smoked chipotle chilli, garlic and “feisty” chilli as well as an incredibly flavoursome lemongrass, garlic, ginger & chilli stir fry oil. Dressings and sauces were added to the product list and currently include a tangy honey and mustard sauce, a zingy lemon dressing and a honey and balsamic dipping oil. Crush has also developed an exceptional selection of granola cereals: who wouldn’t be tempted by a breakfast consisting of honey, apple and cranberry or chocolate and hazelnut granola, to mention just two flavours? From March 2017 the entire granola range became gluten-free to make it accessible to a wider customer base. Earlier, in February 2017, Crush unveiled its egg-free (and vegan friendly) mayonnaise and there are currently two flavours available: garlic and chipotle.

Crush Foods retails in many farm shops, delis and other independent retailers across East Anglia and selected sellers in London and Kent. You can also order the products online via the website: http://www.crush-foods.com

 

JosephJoseph Spiro Spiraliser – Product Review

People who follow ‘The Little Pink Kitchen’ on social media are aware that in the last year I’ve lost a lot of weight at Slimming World – over 5 stone. As a result, I’ve recently changed the focus of my blog from baking (which I love but it isn’t good for my waistline) to healthy eating – although this doesn’t mean that I’ll never eat cake again!

When I say ‘healthy eating’, I don’t mean anything faddy just fresh food that is prepared from scratch in a healthy way (low fat / low sugar etc) but without compromising on flavour.

It was therefore very timely that I was contacted by JosephJoseph who asked if I’d like to try their new 3 in 1 hand-held spiraliser – called Spiro – and write a review. As I’m already a fan of the brand, I had no hesitation in saying yes and yesterday I spent some time playing around with the spiraliser and a selection of vegetables. Oh, and some cheese was involved too.

When you purchase the spiraliser, it looks like this:

fullsizerender-copy-19

Out of the packaging, there are 5 components which include 3 different blades: a coarse and a fine spiralising blade and a grating blade. The soft grip lid is easy to turn and it has 2 guide arms that keep the food straight when you twist it.

fullsizerender-17-copy

The spiralised or grated food is then collected in the clear container which means you don’t get bits of vegetables over the worktop. What’s really handy is how compact the gadget is: when not in use the three blades stack on top of each other and the whole thing takes up hardly any space in a cupboard or a drawer.

fullsizerender-21-copy

I selected vegetables with different textures (courgette, peeled carrot and peeled butternut squash), washed them and trimmed them into straight pieces. JosephJoseph recommends that for the best results, the vegetables should measure roughly 3 inches x 1 ½ inches (8 x 4 cms).

fullsizerender-15-copy

JosephJoseph provides clear instructions on how to use the spiraliser:

  1. Cut food into straight pieces with flat ends
  2. Select blade type – take care as they are sharp!
  3. Place food in the centre of the blade disc and push down onto the spindle in the centre
  4. Place the lid on top and insert the guide arms into the slots
  5. Twist the lid clockwise and push downwards to spiralise. (Try and keep a constant pressure as you twist.)

I started with the courgette and used the fine spiralising blade. While the courgette went through easily enough, the resulting spirals were very small and quite watery so I changed to the coarser blade and this gave thicker and very long courgette spirals. You can see the difference in the photograph below. I patted the spirals dry with kitchen towel afterwards as they have a high water content and I didn’t want them to go soggy.

fullsizerender-16-copy

Next, I tried carrot on the fine blade and again, it worked well although I didn’t get very long spirals. On reflection, this was due to the fact that my carrot was a bit too skinny and once on the spindle, didn’t reach all of the blade. Note to self: next time buy fatter carrots! You can see the result of using a carrot that was too thin in the photograph below although of course it’s still edible.

fullsizerender-20-copy

After this, I used the butternut squash with the coarse blade and given that my pieces were not round, the resulting spirals were good. There were one or two shorter ones but on the whole, the butternut squash ‘spaghetti’ came out very well as you can see in then photograph.

fullsizerender-copy-20

I had intended to try beetroot as well but I couldn’t find any in the supermarket but as in its raw state it is quite hard, I’m sure it would have spiralised well. I’m not sure if it would stain the gadget though so that’s something to be mindful about. Sweet potatoes would also be a suitable vegetable to spiralise.

I’ve eaten a lot of vegetables during my weight loss journey with Slimming World and it’s always good to find new ways to serve them. I really like raw veggies in salads and when they’re spiralised they look so pretty and are easier to eat and digest. Here’s a photograph of my beautiful spiralised vegetables just before I put them in the fridge.fullsizerender-19-copy

We had spiralised raw vegetable salad with our dinner last night with a little lemon juice and a sprinkle of herbs and red jalapeno flakes. My husband added some olive oil to his portion and I have to say, the glistening veggies looked extremely appetising. They would have been equally as good lightly stir-fried with some garlic and perhaps a dash of soy and / or sweet chilli sauce.

One of the latest food trends is to have spiralised vegetables instead of traditional pasta (giving a low carbohydrate option) and in this case, they just need a quick steam for about a minute. Any longer and they will turn to mush so don’t overcook them.

Finally, I tried the grating blade with a chunk of hard cheddar. The cheese went through the grater like butter – very smoothly indeed. You really don’t have to apply a lot of pressure at all on the lid to get good results which makes it ideal for people who don’t have a lot of strength in their wrists or hands.

fullsizerender-18-copy

 

Overall, I was impressed with the JosephJoseph Spiro spiraliser and I’d rate it as follows:

 

Ease of use:                5/5

Easy to clean:              5/5

Easy to assemble:       5/5

Easy to store:              5/5

 

I have previously used another brand’s hand-held spiraliser – one that is described as being operated with a ‘pencil-sharpening’ motion. That one didn’t have its own container and I actually found it quite hard work turning it so it’s currently languishing in the back of a drawer.

I’ve also seen the somewhat clunky spiralisers that you have to assemble that then sit on a worktop, taking up a lot of space. While these might be quite useful for large households, they aren’t particularly attractive and they are quite cumbersome especially as you have to crank a handle to work them. These tend to be recommended by some of the high profile but not always nutritionally qualified ‘clean-eating’ brigade and are quite expensive compared to the Spiro.

In my opinion, the Spiro would be an ideal addition to your kitchen if you have young children as it would certainly encourage them to eat more vegetables. For a two person household like mine, I found it quick and easy to spiralise a few vegetables for us and the clean-up was also fast. The Spiro can be put in a dishwasher although it’s easy to wash it in the sink. I love the fact that all the parts stack up together into a compact little unit which can be easily stored. The Spiro will not be languishing in the back of my cupboards, that’s for sure.

 

You can find the Spiro spiraliser in good cook shops and online at: www.josephjoseph.com. The retail price is £16.

 

A note for Slimming World members (like me) – the Spiro will really encourage you to eat more speed vegetables so do think about buying one.

 

Disclaimer: JosephJoseph sent me a Spiro Spiraliser in return for an honest review. After thoroughly testing it, I was genuinely impressed with it and I will continue to use it. If you’re thinking of purchasing one, I’m happy to discuss my review in more detail with you via email: littlepinkkitchen@hotmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review: Purition Wholefood Shakes

I’m definitely not a ‘gym bunny’ and exercise – apart from occasional bracing walks with the dog – has never played a major part in my life despite having a husband and son who rave about the joys of keeping fit. You may therefore be surprised to hear that I was recently sent some samples of ‘wholefood protein shakes’ to try by the people behind the “Purition” brand.

IMG_4826

Purition claims three uses for its wholefood shakes: 1) for gym, cardio & training support; 2) for healthy eating purposes and 3) for diet & fat loss. Well, that last category is what interested me as when I reflect on my past, I seem to have been one of life’s permanent dieters. And yes, I’m aware that being on a ‘permanent’ diet means that whatever I’ve been doing for the last few years hasn’t been working. I’ve tried a lot of ‘weight reduction’ programmes in my time including WeightWatchers (all those points to calculate and I was still hungry), Atkins (who wouldn’t love a diet where you could eat bacon every day?) and LighterLife (I lost almost 7 stone in 6 months but then went back to my poor eating habits and piled it back on within 2 years).

I’m currently attending a well-known diet club and I’m doing well on it (almost 4 stone gone since January) but I’m finding that sometimes my meal planning goes a bit haywire or I have to dash off to a job interview and don’t have time for breakfast or lunch. Now when you are easily tempted by food that tastes nice (usually involving fat, carbs and lots of sugar) but has absolutely no nutritional value, missing a meal is not the way to go. So what to do?

That’s where I’ve found Purition shakes invaluable. Unlike some brands that contain fillers and things with unpronounceable names (acetylated oxidised starch anyone?), Purition contains ‘real’ ingredients such as nuts, seeds, nutritional yeast and vanilla. Because the shakes contain fibre, you stay full for at least 4 hours which meant that once I’d had a shake for breakfast, I didn’t experience any  “mid-morning munchie moments”. This is a very significant thing for someone like me as feeling hungry when on a diet is usually what derails me.

Here are the ingredients found in Purition shakes:

IMG_4865

And here are the ingredients found in one range of ‘diet’ shakes (where you have 3 shakes a day, tons of water and no other food at all):

exante ingredients

I think you’ll agree there’s quite a difference in the respective contents and from a nutritional point of view, Purition definitely has the edge!  (Apologies for the poor photographs.)

I liked all the Purition varieties I tried especially the macadamia and vanilla. The flavours are subtle and the shakes are made from genuine ingredients and don’t contain cheap fillers and artificial flavourings. The texture is somewhat coarser than a basic protein powder and for some people this may take a little getting used to but it’s good because once you’ve blended it – I used my Nutribullet – with the milk of your choice (cow / soya /almond etc), it thickens up due to the fibre content so each shake is really substantial. If you leave the shake for a while, you may need to eat it with a spoon as it will continue to thicken but that’s not a bad thing.

For anyone wanting to try out Purition for weight loss, on the website there is a 7 day meal plan whereby you’d have two shakes a day plus a snack as well as an evening meal. Information about the shakes for people who exercise is also on the website, of course.

For more information and how to acquire a sample pack of the protein shakes, have a look at the website: www.purition.co.uk

 

 

Disclaimer: I received some free samples of Purition shakes in return for an honest review. This post reflects my genuine opinion of the Purition products and I would definitely recommend them to anyone who, like me, has struggled with their weight. Purition offers a healthy and convenient meal replacement option and a website that gives lots of advice and support.

 

 

 

 

 

A Review of The Hoste, Burnham Market, Norfolk

FullSizeRender - Copy (13)Monday 21st December 2015 was a significant date in my diary: it was our 30th wedding anniversary and as such needed to be celebrated in some way. As we’d only moved to Norfolk from London two weeks earlier, we hadn’t had a chance to book anywhere but luckily when I contacted ‘The Hoste’ in Burnham Market, they said they could fit us in. We decided to treat ourselves to lunch there having heard some excellent reviews. Another attraction was the fact that The Hoste is dog friendly, so Millie our well-behaved cocker spaniel came along too.

Although we’d been visiting Norfolk for more than 20 years, I’d never been to Burnham Market before and I was looking forward to browsing the 30+ independent shops and wandering around the green. Unfortunately, as soon as we got out of the car it started to rain heavily and was very windy so we didn’t really have the opportunity to explore “Norfolk’s loveliest village”. This prompted me to reflect that perhaps it wasn’t a brilliant idea to get married in December!

On the positive side, when we entered ‘The Hoste’, it was warm and inviting and the bar was very lively. We walked through to the restaurant and discovered there were two seating areas: one for people with dogs and one for humans on their own. Our waiter led us to a table and Millie curled up and went to sleep under it.

The lunch menu looked very tempting and considering that many people refer to Burnham Market as “Chelsea-on-Sea”, I thought that the prices weren’t unreasonable for what was, after all, a celebration meal.

 

For our first course, I chose roasted woodland mushrooms cooked with garlic, presented on a brioche slice with parmesan and dressed with an aged balsamic vinegar. The mushrooms were chunky, juicy and full of flavour and the parmesan added a delightful savoury tang.

FullSizeRender (4)

My husband had a locally smoked cod fishcake made with leeks, potatoes and mustard, which was dressed with a light sauce. He said the fishcake had a firm texture and he could clearly taste all the individual ingredients.

FullSizeRender (8) - Copy

A very minor criticism of the starters was that they were both topped with rather a large amount of rocket which concealed the dishes underneath it, as you can see from the photographs. With rocket as a garnish, less is definitely more in my opinion as I find its peppery bitterness somewhat overpowering.

For his main course, my husband chose the roasted Norfolk turkey with all the trimmings and I had seared calf’s liver. I don’t usually eat offal but in a good restaurant, calf’s liver can be outstanding so I had my fingers crossed that The Hoste’s chef would do it justice.

The turkey ‘trimmings’ were very good: my husband said the fondant potato melted in his mouth and the chestnut, apple and ginger stuffing made a change from the ubiquitous ‘sage and onion’ that proliferates at this time of year. As for the turkey itself, he said the breast was well cooked but he was a little disappointed by the brown meat (which he’s not fond of anyway) as it was chewy. He left some on the side of his plate and I have to say, it did look rather gristly. I don’t know if restaurants actually cook whole turkeys – as you would expect – or whether breasts and legs come separately but it was a shame that one small element of the bird wasn’t as good as the rest of the dish.

FullSizeRender - Copy (12)

The calf’s liver was very good and was served with a generous amount of Great Ryburgh bacon (I have heard that the butcher in the village of Great Ryburgh is excellent and that people travel miles for his meat). The creamed potato was smooth and delicious and the accompanying onion gravy and the buttered spinach I’d requested rounded off my main course very nicely.

FullSizeRender (6) - Copy

Our plates were cleared and as we were debating whether to have a dessert, our waiter appeared with an unexpected plate of petits fours – see the photograph. I think I mentioned it was our wedding anniversary when I booked so it was a lovely gesture that we really appreciated.

FullSizeRender - Copy (14)

We finally decided we’d share a dessert and we ordered the chocolate fondant with honeycomb and a blood orange sorbet plus two spoons. The dark fondant had a perfectly melted centre which oozed onto the plate when I cut into it. The blood orange sorbet was divine with a sweet sharpness that cut through the richness of the chocolate. This dish elevated the classic chocolate and orange combination to a very high level indeed and served as an excellent finish to our meal.

FullSizeRender (7) - Copy

The service at The Hoste was excellent – attentive but not intrusive – and we were genuinely touched that someone thought of marking our anniversary in a small way with the presentation of the petits fours. The meal including service came to just under £75, which we felt was acceptable for a special (and filling) anniversary lunch without alcohol.

I’d recommend The Hoste at Burnham Market and would rate it 9/10 for food and ambience and 10/10 for service. It also gets plus points for being dog friendly.

 

www.thehoste.com

 

 

 

Disclaimer: This review reflects my honest opinion of the food my husband and I were served (and paid for) at The Hoste on 21st December 2015. I was not asked to write the review nor did I receive any incentives for doing so.

 

 

Scarlett & Mustard product reviews with recipes

I was asked by ‘My Foodie Heaven’ to try out and review some products made by Scarlett & Mustard. I’d already heard of the company and had seen some of their products with their quirky labelling in the shops so I was keen to see what they were like.

I received a parcel containing the delightfully named ‘Rudolph’s Left Overs Curry Sauce’, an English rapeseed oil flavoured with truffle (oil, not chocolates!) and a blackcurrant and star anise curd.

When I’m asked to review any food product, rather than just sticking my finger in the jar, tasting it and rating it out of ten, where possible I try to create a recipe that will really bring out the flavour. At the moment, we’re in the middle of moving from Surrey to Norfolk and so it’s slightly chaotic in our house . However, we still need to eat but as my kitchen facilities are now rather basic, any food I prepare has to be quick and easy.

With that in mind, I came up with two recipes using the Left Overs Curry Sauce and the truffle rapeseed oil and decided to test the blackcurrant and star anise curd out as part of a traditional afternoon tea.

FullSizeRender - Copy (11)

 

‘Rudolph’s Left Overs Curry Sauce’ is an oil free dressing full of fruity, tangy flavours and it will, quite simply, transform your left overs from one meal into a tasty dish for another. You don’t have to limit yourself to using it for left overs though: I used it to make a light ‘coronation’ style sauce to have with chicken which was delicious. By mixing Greek yoghurt with Rudolph’s in a 2:1 ratio, I had a simple sauce which was far superior to the heavy ‘coronation chicken’ dish I recall from the 1970s (which was basically curry powder mixed with mayonnaise). What I liked about Rudolph’s is that you could actually taste the fruit in it (mango chutney, apricots and sultanas) and the heat from the ginger and curry powder was subtle.

Coronation chicken S and M

 

Scarlett & Mustard also recommend Rudolph’s with roasts (including your Christmas bird if you plan to have one), on rice and peas, on potatoes and even on salads. What you do with it is only limited by your imagination. I’m sorry the photo of my chicken dish isn’t brilliant – my ‘staging’ props for my photos have been packed away but you get the idea.

 

For the English truffle rapeseed oil, I thought a potato recipe would be in order as it would be blending two wonderfully earthy flavours together. Readers of this blog will be aware from previous posts that I love the versatility of the humble spud and for this recipe I turned once again to Maris Pipers but you could use any floury potato for this dish.

 

image3 - Copy (8)

 

Truffled Crushed Potatoes

Ingredients – for 2 servings

300g Maris Piper potatoes

150mls semi skimmed milk (or use soya milk for vegan option)

I twig of fresh rosemary

1 tbsp Scarlett & Mustard English Rapeseed Truffle Oil

3 tbsp single cream (or use vegan cream)

 

Method

  1. Cut the potatoes into chunks and put in a large saucepan with the milk and add a little water to cover. Season with a little salt if required. Once boiling, allow to simmer for 15 – 20 minutes until tender. Add the rosemary twig about 5 minutes before the end so it infuses the cooking liquid.
  2. Drain the potatoes leaving a little of the cooking liquid but throw away the rosemary.
  3. Using a potato masher, gently crush the potatoes to break them up. You aren’t looking for mashed potatoes so go carefully!
  4. Add the truffle oil and the cream to the potatoes and turn them gently to coat.
  5. Tip the potatoes into an ovenproof dish and place under a hot grill for a few minutes to brown the top.
  6. If you’ve made the potatoes to eat later, you can reheat them in the oven for 15 – 20 minutes at 180 C / 200 C fan or gas mark 6 until the top goes golden.
  7. Eat and enjoy.

I’m afraid there isn’t a photo of this dish as it was demolished as soon as it came out of the oven!

 

Finally, for the blackcurrant and star anise curd, I used it to fill Viennese whirls and I also sampled it on a scone with butter. I was apprehensive about how the star anise would affect the flavour of the blackcurrant but I have to say that it’s an inspired combination. The blackcurrant is not over-sweet or sugary and the star anise gives it a real warmth without overshadowing the fruity flavour.

 

image2 - Copy (21)

 

I used my friend Kevin’s recipe for the Viennese whirls – you can find it on his blog www.thecraftylarder.co.uk – and dipped them in white chocolate and sprinkles. Bit of a girly moment!

 

FullSizeRender - Copy (10)

 

I can confirm that based on my tasting of the products I was sent, Scarlett & Mustard are purveyors of excellent foodie items and I recommend you look out for them in your local shops. They’d make ideal Christmas presents and would look particularly stylish in an elegant hamper.

 

All Scarlett & Mustard products can be found on their website: www.scarlettandmustard.co.uk

 

 

Disclaimer: I was sent a package of Scarlett & Mustard goods to review and I was not paid. My review reflects my honest opinion of the items I was given.

footer-delicious-text

 

footer-delicious-text

With The Girlies At Galu

OK so I’ve used a bit of artistic licence with the title of this post as no way could we three friends realistically be classed as ‘girlies’. None of us will see 40 again although my friends are nearer to it than I am. Anyway, let’s move on……..

My friend K was abroad for her birthday in August and so on Friday 4th September 2015 we went with another friend J for a belated birthday meal at Galu, a restaurant in Banstead, Surrey. Galu is a ‘Mediterranean bar and grill’ with a bespoke open flame charcoal grill located in the heart of the open view kitchen. As you enter the premises, the stylish bar is to the left and the restaurant to the right.

pic1_r3_c3

We were seated immediately and I was struck by the spacious feel of the restaurant despite the fact that it was busy. It also is light and airy due in part to the floor to ceiling windows along one side of the building. The lighting was a little subdued but not so much that you couldn’t read the menus or see each other. I have a real issue with lighting that’s ‘barely there’. If you’re having a romantic meal (which K, J and I weren’t), dimmed lights might be quite conducive but generally I like to be able to see the people I’m dining with and not hazard a guess at what’s on the menu!

pic1_r3_c2

We were presented with the a la carte menu as well as details of the day’s ‘specials’. There was a wide choice of dishes available so there really should be something to suit everyone. For starters, J and I had the seared king scallops wrapped in pancetta and served with a pea puree while K had warm goat’s cheese served on aubergine with rocket. If scallops are on a menu I always tend to choose them as I’m not allowed to cook anything vaguely ‘fishy’ or ‘sea foody’ at home as my husband believes that the whole house smells of fish for days afterwards. The scallops we had were outstanding: tender, juicy and more importantly not overcooked. A rubbery scallop does not a happy diner make!

For the main course I chose calves liver with bacon, buttered spinach and creamy mash. I don’t ever cook or eat liver at home due to my husband’s queasiness about offal so this was a real treat for me. K had a dish from the ‘specials’ list: herb crusted rump of lamb with roasted new potatoes and creamed spinach while J couldn’t resist a juicy sirloin steak with peppercorn sauce. Judging by the ‘mmmms’ and ‘ooohs’ I heard coming from their direction, their meals were equally delicious.

To accompany our meal, we had two bottles of wine, one of which was a pink Prosecco (yes, PINK!) – both bottles went down rather well, I must say.

We were so satisfied by our two courses and our wine that we couldn’t manage any puds even though the dessert menu was rather tempting.

We did, however, manage to squeeze in a complementary drink at the bar after dinner thanks to Vas (who owns the restaurant with his father John). J had a rather spectacular fruity based cocktail which she found to be a little livelier taste wise than she first thought while K and I settled for the simpler options of wine (her) and Irish cream (me). While we were in the bar, I was quite taken with the mixology skills of the barman and just had to take a photo of him in action. Apologies for the poor quality of the picture – my flash was playing up. Note to self: buy a decent camera for blog purposes!

image1 - Copy (16)

One other very important point: the ladies’ loos were spotless. I can’t comment on the gents (a review too far I’d say) but I’m sure they were equally gleaming. I’ve been in so many restaurants where there is a lack of lavatorial attention so Galu got extra brownie points for that.

I couldn’t fault the food, service or atmosphere at Galu and my friends and I had a great time. I will definitely go back again and I’d recommend that anyone who lives within a reasonable distance of Banstead also gives it a try. You won’t be disappointed but if you go on a Friday or Saturday night you’d be sensible to make a reservation as it’s a very popular place.

Disclaimer: We paid for our meal but accepted complementary drinks from the restaurant owner. I was not paid for or asked to write this review.